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50 years of Arts and Humanities

West Virginia Musicians

  • If You Love My West Virginia by Colleen Anderson

    Travis Stimeling says:
    This song, which uses powerful and evocative language to critique the political and industrial establishments' reliance on polluting extractive industries to drive our state's economy, was debuted on the floor of the WV House of Delegates during a public hearing on a bill written in response to the Elk River chemical spill. Anderson, a self-described "West Virginian by choice," has been a leader in the folk arts and literary communities of the Mountain State since the early 1970s.

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  • Appalachian Music by John Beall

    Michael Ibrahim says:
    Composer John Beall has shaped his West Virginia career by combining Appalachian folk music and hymn tunes with contemporary classical idioms. His Wondrous Love Variations for viola and piano was recently included on his album Appalachian Inspiration released on Ravello Records. The performers are West Virginia violist Stephen Beall and pianist Carol Beall.

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  • Voodoo! The Exotic Sounds of Robert Drasnin

    Kolin Brown says:
    This lesser known album is the perfect example of the dark, sultry and mysterious sounds of Exotica jazz from the late 1950’s. Robert Drasnin was born in Charleston, WV and recently died on May 13, 2015.

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  • My Home Among The Hills by E.W. James, Jr.

    Susan Arnold says:
    I would like to recommend the song “My Home Among the Hills” written by E.W. James, Jr. in 1963 in honor of the state’s centennial. It is a beautiful depiction of West Virginia, both in melody and verse, composed by a native West Virginian.

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  • Walk The Way The Wind Blows by Kathy Mattea

    Jay Cole says:
    From West Virginia: Kathy Mattea’s Walk the Way the Wind Blows is a very good country music album and features the song “Leaving West Virginia,” which describes beautifully the anguish many people feel when they leave a place they know and love.

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  • Sunny Isle by Josh Mei

    Josh Mei says:
    I am submitting my own song for this event, as I am a Morgantown native and artist/songwriter. This song describes the lifestyle of a Hip Hop recording artist (like myself) and the experiences I've had being an Asian American who was raised in Morgantown, West Virginia.

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  • Spectrual Park & The Furr

    Eli Pollard says:
    We are all WVU graduates, & one of us is a current WVU faculty. This new release has garnered very positive reviews from Paris, London, Israel, Brooklyn, etc.

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  • Willow by Jenny Wilson Trio

    Kimberly Cameron says:
    Jenny and Nathan Wilson are Morgantown transplants who have embraced the town and the state as their own. Their jazz performances and recordings express a mix of classical, world music and traditional jazz.

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  • Ain't No Sunshine by Bill Withers

    Chirstina Fattore says:
    In this song, you can hear every emotion as he mourns his love's departure. Bill Withers' voice and songwriting abilities are flawless, and this song may be a step above that.

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  • Lean On Me by Bill Withers

    Kimberly Cameron says:
    Bill grew up in a mining town in West Virginia; his father died when he was 13. He overcame numerous obstacles and followed his passion and went beyond with his music.

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  • Grandma's Hands by Bill Withers

    Glenn Taylor says:
    One could choose most any song from the genius catalogue of my fellow West Virginian, the timeless Bill Withers, and hear in it a full grasp of the power of music.

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  • Lovely Day by Bill Withers

    Glenn Taylor says:
    One could choose most any song from the genius catalogue of my fellow West Virginian, the timeless Bill Withers, and hear in it a full grasp of the power of music.

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  • West Virginia Boys and Girls. A WV 4-H club traditional 4-H song.

    Rebecca Flint-Clark says:
    This song is a symbolic song of our 4-H program that is sang during community club meetings and 4-H camps throughout the state to celebrate the most important part of 4-H- our West Virginia Boys and Girls, the members who dedicate countless hours to learn life skills and be productive citizens within their communities.

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